What to do in 2010 with the tech trends from 2009?

There are multiple ways to view the technology market for aging in place -- in the 2009 Market Overview, relevance is described as matching stages of frailty, and products are categorized by role in successful aging. Recently we took a look at life stage decision-points and how they trigger a need or desire for a technology that may be in the market. Today let's match a few of these decision points with 2009 tech trends, recent Microsoft-AARP Baby Boomers and Technology coverage, making a few recommendations. >>> Read more . . .

2009 Spawned Ten Aging in Place Trends to Watch in 2010

It's the end of the year and time for that wrap-up of the indicators from 2009 that will drive trends for 2010 -- what it all means -- more analysis on another day.

1. Location-aware tech enables more info, greater safety.  GPS became even more useful in 2009. Verizon replaced its Chaperone service with Family Locator, The Alzheimer's Association introduced its ComfortZone (powered by OmniLink), several other tracking technology vendors launched, and location-based mapping and direction technologies, 2009 was a good GPS-enabled year. >>> Read more . . .

Marketing and Selling Technology for Aging in Place

Time for an update -- more surveys, more vendors. I just updated the Aging in Place Technology Market Overview to incorporate other example vendors and links to studies about seniors and technology. This is going to be a regular task -- lately I have stumbled across a plethora of surveys from MetLife's Mature Market Institute, Nielsen, and the everywhere-at-once AARP. As I find them, I post on the Trends page of this site, most recent at the top. And then there are many more vendors and tech services and websites, way too many for a market overview, but I've added more examples than the previous version. >>> Read more . . .

Where are you when you need help -- a Panasonic pilot error

Another day, another idea from Japan on how to help seniors be and feel safe(r) -- this time from Panasonic. The aging wave or 'silver market' in Japan (22% are 65+) is the fastest growing segment and has prompted numerous corporate experiments on how to care for (or at least keep tabs on) people who have no nearby family. >>> Read more . . .

The nirvana of aging in place and other age-related reality disconnects

It seems as though there is a seasonal cluster to everything -- conferences (spring and fall), concerts (fall through spring), and... communication about surveys and studies. During the fall of studies announcements, we've seen some interesting and sometimes ironic juxtapositions: >>> Read more . . .

On Aging in Place versus Healthcare Unbound

Having watched the home health technology market crawl along at a snail’s pace for most of the last decade, I’m excited to expand my focus to aging in place.  I see a fundamental — and absolutely critical — difference between the narrow focus of healthcare unbound/remote health monitoring market and the more expansive purview of aging in place.  That difference can be summed up as the difference between fear and hope. >>> Read more . . .

Introducing -- new blogger -- Liz Boehm of Forrester Research!

Adding an expert to this blog! I am so excited -- Liz Boehm, Principal Analyst extroardinaire at Forrester Research, would like to contribute her insights on aging in place and I am so pleased to have her write and to introduce her to readers.  I'll let her explain it herself -- why writing about this matters to her, but this is great for those of us who care about the topic and want to accelerate the pace of understanding and adoption.  >>> Read more . . .

Gifts -- Aging in Place and Related

The planes are becoming full of holiday travelers... At Thanksgiving time, I wrote a blog post about visits with aging family members -- and being on the lookout to see if they need help remaining independent.  In that post, there were links to videophones, eBook devices, computers with cameras, and a variety of other useful items that you may have noticed could be helpful. >>> Read more . . .

Caregiving in the U.S. 2009 offers material for tech marketers

Caregiving -- by older women, for older women. The new report, Caregiving in the U.S. 2009, sponsored by the National Alliance for Caregiving, AARP, and MetLife (and funded by MetLife) is a comprehensive survey of 1480 caregivers, defined as those age 18 and over who provide unpaid help to another person. The most intriguing aspect of the study is the comparison to the last published version from 2004.  Seventy percent of those surveyed care for someone over the age of 50; of these 66% of the caregivers are female and their average age has gone up from 46 to 49 -- with the average age of care recipients who are age 75 and older up from 43% to 51%. Average time in the caregiving role -- 4.6 years. Takeaway: all are aging, caregivers are in for the long haul.  >>> Read more . . .

What Boomers Want from Technology 2009 and other aging theories

Microsoft and AARP -- boomers and technology. Yesterday's New York Times 'Bits' blog summarized a study dated October, 2009 -- funded by Microsoft and AARP and conducted through 60 dinner interviews in four cities of boomers age 50-60.  The comments posted on the NY Times website are more revealing (and scathing) about what boomers really want from technology (and as an added bonus, how younger folks really can't stand self-interested boomers). I suggest that rev 2 of this study analyze these and release an addendum. >>> Read more . . .

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