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E-mail device — where are the vendors?

Today’s WSJ’s Mossberg column mentions a device, the only one on the market today, called the Mailbug, which is a text-only terminal for sending and receiving e-mail over a dial-up connection. Costing $125 plus $100/year service, it doesn’t permit exchange of photos (check out Presto and Celery) for that. There's also a hand-held device called PocketMail Composer for $99. The nearly complete absence of simple devices to enable the elderly to read and send e-mail is a testimony to the inability of vendors to approach the elderly with a product they could use. People who don’t want to deal with Vista, backups, reboots, and e-mail configuration. Only 19% of those 65 and older have broadband connections — but I am willing to bet that the other 81% have telephones.

Comments

What was I thinking — of course there are more products — it is just that Walter Mossberg (what a surprise) doesn’t know about them. And neither did I — here’s another:
http://www.mycelery.com/

Celery automatically prints incoming email including image and PDF attachments. Celery also lets its users send outgoing handwritten messages via email. It’s the best of both worlds. http://www.mycelery.com

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