Meet or hear Laurie in one of the following:

Webinar: Tech-Enabled Home Care in 21st Century, Jan 24, 2019

Washington DC, February 7-8, 2019

HIMSS, Orlando, February 11-12, 2019

Washington, DC, May 30, 2019

Silicon Valley Boomer Venture Summit, June 5, 2019

Related News Articles

01/22/2019

Amazement and dismay at the show floor of CES in the context of tech for older adults.

01/19/2019

More CES offerings -- including "automating guilt."

01/17/2019

Tech that will help older adults stay independent.

01/16/2019

 Another possible deal for subsidizing the cost of the watch. 

01/16/2019

At this year’s CES, products to help older people with daily life and health issues.

Market Overview for Technology for Aging in Place

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IoT and home monitoring

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IoT and home monitoring

Cameras -- not necessarily a privacy invasion for dementia

For those who provide care for those with dementia or other limitations -- AARP's Healthy@Home notes that seniors may not object as much as thought to an obvious barrier -- fear of privacy invasion if it can a) make them feel safer, or b) give them more personal peace of mind as well as that of their family and friends..

Fall detection -- human airbags -- nonsense or good sense?

The 'inventive' Japanese who brought you the web-connected tea kettle in 2005, have something to offer for fall detection and prevention beyond motion sensors. A Japanese company has invented an airbag that inflates in 0.1 of a second if it detects a person falling backwards.

Is home monitoring privacy a non-issue for seniors?

Not so very long ago -- 5 years --  an inventor I spoke with received funding from a VC firm to create a remote-controlled telephone, one that would record messages and remind seniors to take a pill and press a flashing button when they took it. However, after focus groups were conducted, the project was dropped. Seniors objected to the privacy invasion and interference by their adult children.

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GE Healthcare Partners With Living Independently's QuietCare

GE Heathcare announced this week "that it will distribute and co-market Living Independently's QuietCare products globally." QuietCare "alerts caregivers to behavioral changes that may signal potential health issues or emergency situations." My view -- this represents an intersection between the health and aging in place marketplaces. How it gets categorized may significantly influence market adoption.

AARP Healthy@Home Survey Provides Clues About Technology Uptake

For those interested in technology for aging in place, the 2008 AARP Healthy@Home Survey by Linda Barrett, Ph.D, of AARP Knowledge Management, is a remarkable resource and should be carefully studied - I have only begun to absorb some of the key points in it and will return to this again many times.

Home Monitoring - Beyond Personal Emergency Response

Mom is in Florida, adult children are far away. I see it all the time --  frail elders who want to stay where it's warm. and of course, they have adult children who can't or won't live near them. And technology vendors, as I saw at the AARP convention, and described in this well-written NY Times article, want to fill this nervewracking void.

When doctors do their jobs, the elderly fall less

Yuk. A study in today’s NY Times reports that percentage of elderly people who fall drops by 11% if the doctor actually asks them if they are prone to falls — then takes their blood pressure lying down and standing, treats it properly, and then reduces their other medication. How ironic that the doctor who did the study notes she can’t estimate the cost of this ‘prevention’ program because it ought to be part of standard care. Exactly.

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