Market Overview for Technology for Aging in Place

Meet or hear Laurie in one of the following:

InsureTech, Washington, DC, May 30, 2019

Silicon Valley Boomer Venture Summit, June 6, 2019

DC Longevity Summit, December, 2019

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IoT and home monitoring

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IoT and home monitoring

Home monitoring studies analysis -- boomers need to try harder to learn about what exists

I admit that I am a bit of a nerd; I find survey data very interesting. It’s especially intriguing when it exposes trends that are both counterintuitive and actionable. So it is with two studies that I tackle the questions of senior and caregiver readiness to use home monitoring technology that can help seniors age in place and stay in their homes longer.

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Ready or not, builders, here comes aging tech in the home

Builders have little interest in changing their home-design practices to accomodate seniors -- unless pressured by consumers who want their homes designed that way, of course.  In fact, in Florida, universal design standards are not part of the building code for new buildings, although contractors can be certified in it as well as becoming

Is monitoring the house the right first step to monitoring well-being of seniors?

The home monitoring market for seniors is a potentially converging set of product vendors, some with medical interests and origins that may over time be marketed for use in advance of medical need -- these include HealthHero, Honeywell HomMed, Dovetail Health (even linking to nurse monitoring).

Let's keep perspective on Project Lifesaver for wandering Alzheimer's

Many who want to age in place suffer from some early memory loss themselves -- or they have a spouse or other relative with dementia. But is this technology consistent and optimal across state boundaries? It looks like every state (now 11 or more) can and probably will implement Project Lifesaver Silver Alerts that use some sort of bracelet with a notification to local police.

Cameras -- not necessarily a privacy invasion for dementia

For those who provide care for those with dementia or other limitations -- AARP's Healthy@Home notes that seniors may not object as much as thought to an obvious barrier -- fear of privacy invasion if it can a) make them feel safer, or b) give them more personal peace of mind as well as that of their family and friends..

Fall detection -- human airbags -- nonsense or good sense?

The 'inventive' Japanese who brought you the web-connected tea kettle in 2005, have something to offer for fall detection and prevention beyond motion sensors. A Japanese company has invented an airbag that inflates in 0.1 of a second if it detects a person falling backwards.

Is home monitoring privacy a non-issue for seniors?

Not so very long ago -- 5 years --  an inventor I spoke with received funding from a VC firm to create a remote-controlled telephone, one that would record messages and remind seniors to take a pill and press a flashing button when they took it. However, after focus groups were conducted, the project was dropped. Seniors objected to the privacy invasion and interference by their adult children.

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GE Healthcare Partners With Living Independently's QuietCare

GE Heathcare announced this week "that it will distribute and co-market Living Independently's QuietCare products globally." QuietCare "alerts caregivers to behavioral changes that may signal potential health issues or emergency situations." My view -- this represents an intersection between the health and aging in place marketplaces. How it gets categorized may significantly influence market adoption.

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