Meet or hear Laurie in one of the following:

HIMSS Orlando, February 20,21, 2017

What's Next Boomer Business Summit, Chicago, March 21-24, 2017

Boston, April 30, 2017

Washington, April 29, 2017

Boston, May 1, 2017

Related News Articles

02/17/2017

The tech giants are working on adding voice-calling features to Echo and Google Home.

02/17/2017

The effort is hung up over concerns about privacy, telecom regulations and emergency services. 

02/17/2017

Health spending is projected to grow annually at a rate of 5.6% on average from 2016 to 2025.

02/16/2017

65 to 74 hold more than 5 times the debt that similar ages held 20 years ago.

02/15/2017

Wireless headphones designed specifically for people with some hearing loss.

Market Overview for Technology for Aging in Place

Watch for updated Market Overview 2/28/2017

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mHealth-Digital Health-Telehealth

What are the rules, what are the criteria for innovation competitions?

Everyone loves competitions – but could they be better?  RANT ON. So what could be better than innovation competitions? Especially those that focus on improving quality of life for older adults? So in the face of these feel-good goals, here are a few laudable calls-to-action phrases from past competitions. From Aging 2.0: "quality of overall concept, viability of product or service" and "impact on the aging experience – potential to improve quality of life for older adults, caregivers, and/or revolutionize the aging services industry." From Stanford Longevity Design Challenge:  "Create well-designed, practical solutions that address key issues associated with aging." From a CAST/Leading Age student competition: "Transform existing products or create new ones that would appeal to middle-aged adults. Students in gerontology, engineering, business, industrial design, architecture and social work are especially encouraged to participate."  

Quackery and snake oil – maybe that IS the state of health tech

Firestorm from the American Medical Association.  A few weeks ago, the CEO of the AMA, Dr. James Madara, said what few others will say: "…the explosion of direct-to-consumer digital health products, to apps of mixed quality – it’s the digital snake oil of the early 21st century."  And if that weren’t enough, he compared the technology innovations today (including "ineffective" EHRs) as analogous to the challenges confronting 'quackery' when the AMA was founded in 1847.  Then came the chorus of rebuttals from health IT folk and the Boston Brahmins of digital health, including Dr. Joseph Kvedar ("telemedicine is unstoppable") and Dr. John Halamka ("no snake oil to see here!").  But adults are downloading health apps – in one study, at least half of the surveyed population had downloaded at least one.  Using, not so much.

Five Technology Innovations for Older Adults – June, 2016

As the event season winds down, let’s reflect.  Has there been a technology breakthrough this year?  Consider the 2016 conferences, including CES,  JP Morgan Health Investing, AARP LivePitch, 1 Million Cups Coffee Pitch, Digital Health Summer Summit, and soon, the Silicon Valley Boomer Venture Summit. Just before the fall season kicks off with more startups and events, what has been interesting, new, and/or recent in the way of announcements? Here are five, all text from their own media/material:

Medtronic and Qualcomm Collaborate to Aim to Improve Care and Health Outcomes for People with Type 2 Diabetes

05/25/2016

DUBLIN and SAN DIEGO - May 25, 2016 - Medtronic plc (MDT) and Qualcomm Incorporated (QCOM) through its wholly-owned subsidiary, Qualcomm Life, Inc., today announced a global, multi-year collaboration to jointly develop future generation continuous glucose monitoring

Chronological age, exercise and wearable fitness tech for older adults

Chronological age has no impact on health and well-being – per this study. Apparently, blood pressure and cholesterol readings aren’t the whole story.  What matters more are sensory function, mental health, mobility and health behaviors. This is according to a summary of an abstract of research at the University of Chicago.  But it re-enforces other research about the correlation between exercise and warding off dementia.  And for those who never got around to exercise but have a fear of falling in their 80s and beyond, exercise like Tai Chi can restore balance in an 85-year-old, building confidence and reduce fall risk and fear of falling.

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