Meet Laurie in one of the following places:

Boston area -- July 17-August 26, 2015

Boston, September 15-16, 2015

LeadingAge Boston November 1-4, 2015

Health 2.0, Santa Clara, CA, October 4-7, 2015

 

Related News Articles

07/24/2015

Technology can help people stay at home longer.

07/14/2015

A new study that suggests the start of middle age is no longer 45 or 50 but, instead, 60.

07/14/2015

At summit, experts discussed making technology accessible to seniors. A study on topic was also released by AARP.

07/13/2015

Honor hopes to start a trend of tech companies focusing on the needs of seniors.

Market Research Reports

Updated: (01-29-2015) Technology Market Overview Report Click here

Published: (06-20-2014) Challenging Innovators 2014 Report Click here

Published (03-08-2013) Next Generation Response Systems Click here

Updated (8-25-2012) Aging and Health Technology Report Click here

Updated (7-31-2012) The Future of Home Care Technology Click here

Published (2-14-2012) Linkage Technology Survey Age 65-100 Report Click here

Published (4-29-2011) Connected Living for Social Aging Report Click here

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August 2012

Tech design -- we're getting older, but is it getting better?

The best consumer tech is barely out-of-the-box usable – for anyone.  iPad, Schmipad. Although there is always a story here or there about one who loves the device and wants to teach others (60 days of classes!!!), apps like Family Ribbon to make it easier to use continue to pop up along with training both in store and beyond. So in the face of so much enthusiasm, it is hard for me to say this, but guess what? If you aren’t born imagining that 4 fingers would reveal the already created task row of previously used apps, that menus disappear, that the style of user interface for various apps is inconsistent, that screen-to-screen navigation varies from touching a tiny dot at the screen base to swiping a swoop to the next page, 60 days of training sounds like a pretty good idea. And as far as user interface design, this is the best of the best and it is not acceptable! Read more ... about Tech design -- we're getting older, but is it getting better?

Memory care and child day care -- two sides of the same coin

Are we at the crossroads of care? We are at an interesting and somewhat ominous crossroads in the care of those with dementia.  AARP (and the media that quote them endlessly) repeat that adults want to remain in their own home as they age.  Nice goal, but, not such a good fit for everybody. So combine the growing longevity of middle class adults with the beginnings of a multi-year revival in home sales and perhaps home prices, seniors may have an easier time selling and moving that will shift the average age of residents below today's age 89. To families searching for options, expensive assisted living memory units may look like good care options for those with serious functional memory loss.  But are they really good care? Read more ... about Memory care and child day care -- two sides of the same coin

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Four elements of tech reimagined

My brain hurts.  AARP is hosting an upcoming innovation competition for their Life@50+ event in New Orleans – and they are soliciting entrepreneurs: 'LivePitch pitch event participants will be focused on consumer-oriented health technologies for the "50 and over" market.'  So what IS a consumer-oriented health technology for the 50+ that is not also a consumer-oriented health technology for the under-50?   In fact, 50 is an arbitrary dividing line for AARP based on its stated mission – someday that may be re-stated as the 40+, or more sensibly, with our lengthening life expectancies and lengthening work lives (see new LinkedIn partnership called 'Work Reimagined'), maybe it will be the 60+ or the 70+.  Or multiple AARPs – as there are today that are based on language and geography.  There’s a reason AARP is not spelled out to include ‘retired persons.’ Read more ... about Four elements of tech reimagined

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Home care organizations should prepare for a tech-enabled future

This advice is for non-medical home care, home health care, and geriatric care management organizations and is drawn from the July 31, 2012 report, Future of Home Care Technology Report. The report surveyed 315 organizations spanning 34,509 workers. Based on the limited use of technology today, but the growing wave about the inevitability of data sharing about care recipients across the significant boundaries of home care, home health care, hospitals, rehabilitation/nursing homes and assisted living. Organizations of each type of care delivered into the home will need to prepare now for the inevitability of a Home Care Information Network that must be sponsored, delivered and adopted over the next five years. To maximize its benefit, organizations that deliver care must: Read more ... about Home care organizations should prepare for a tech-enabled future

Self-delusional or optimistic – marketing to mindset

If asked, older adults are content with their lives. Is life good? So concludes a new poll: "USA TODAY partnered with United Healthcare and the National Council on Aging to gauge the attitudes of Americans age 60 and above. And, surprisingly, most are content with their finances, their health and where they live, and most are optimistic about the years to come: "75% of seniors in their 60s expect their quality of life to get better or stay the same over the next five to 10 years." But do those surveyed really have reason to be optimistic, or with a stated median net worth of $212,000, which includes the value of their house, is this self-delusion?   Read more ... about Self-delusional or optimistic – marketing to mindset

Best cities for successful aging -- can you believe it?

We are a society that loves rankings. But sometimes they just seem plain silly. Not long ago, the World Health Organization published a guide to Age-Friendly Cities – and surprise, there was New York City! Services, public transportation, technology galore – despite the crushing crowds on the street, eye-popping apartment rents and tough-as-nails subway riders – if you live there and you're growing old, you can do fine, says the WHO. Okay. So now we have the Milken Institute (a West Coast think tank) study about the 10 best cities where we can age successfully, and it’s much-publicized and picked up in the media, for its, uh, surprising, result. Factoring in affordability (!), weather, convenient transportation systems, aging-centered technology, there it was again – New York City, and now -- Boston is # 4!  For cities that are named on these lists, of course that means positive PR for city managers. Hear applause all around among the town marketers (see, there’s our town, Provo, Utah!!!). In the meantime, Louisville, KY, staking its future as a hub of age-related businesses and opportunity, ranked only 69 on the Milken scale. Read more ... about Best cities for successful aging -- can you believe it?

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