seniors and aging policy

Tech for aging at home – plenty of news, what’s the meaning?

In tackling aging with tech -- interesting few weeks.  Sometimes odd things happen in sequences that beg a backward search for meaning. So let’s recap: within the past three weeks, Silicon Valley VCs invested in a presumably tech-enabled home care agency, Apple and IBM coughed up 5 million iPads for Japanese seniors (to “tackle aging”), and the US Senate held a hearing on the benefits of technology for those aging at home. Some might see these three disparate events, when viewed together, as a trend that shows how tech, big companies, and public policy are all coming together in an age-related trifecta of tech transformation. Whew! >>> Read more . . .

Look back at innovation competitions to help older adults

Competitions abound – all need groundwork.  Just a few years ago you might have noticed that there were few business plan competitions for products and services targeting the older adult market (the Silicon Valley Boomer Venture Summit begun by Mary Furlong in 2004 was a rare exception.)  When its Letter of Intent page appeared at the end of 2011, CMS innovation grant applications included technology submissions behind the scenes, in partnership with non-profits and healthcare delivery organizations. Then came the $1 billion round two announced in December 2014 – and with that, multiple other tech solutions were included to help deliver significant changes, including health information exchanges, patient engagement, the emerging field of population health, and today’s CMS reimbursement for telehealth.  With these approvals, CMS effectively laid the groundwork for many of the firms that compete today in health segments. >>> Read more . . .

Baycrest Health Sciences to lead $100 million partnership in brain health and aging innovation

04/21/2015

Baycrest Health Sciences will lead a new Canadian venture aimed at optimizing the cognitive, emotional and physical well-being of older adults—across the country and around the globe. >>> Read more . . .

Aging in What Place – Oversold concept or the refuge of denial?

The Washington Post article about aging in place was, uh, provocative.  It provoked me, anyway. The concept of aging in place has been oversold, says Professor Stephen Golant, author of a new book called less provocatively Aging in the Right Place. The Post encapsulation included a few gems from his book, noting that seniors who prefer to age in place have 'residential inertia' --  and paraphrasing their thinking as 'I’d rather rot in my own home.'  The premise that the concept was oversold to the public, however, makes a nice headline, almost sounding like a marketing campaign -- but that simply is not what has happened in the recent past. What else was going on? >>> Read more . . .

Connecting disability, longevity and technology for seniors

Did you know that nearly 40% of seniors report having a disability? In the category of number obsession, this new snapshot of a government report caught my eye and should catch yours – it is referencing 16 million people. The report notes six types of disability reported in census data: hearing, sight, thinking and memory, walking, self-care and independent living.  From the MedlinePlus release: "People older than 85 accounted for more than 25 percent of all disabilities among seniors, although they represented only 14 percent of the overall senior population." >>> Read more . . .

40 Percent of Seniors Report Having a Disability

People older than 85 accounted for more than 25 percent of all disabilities among seniors.

12/05/2014

CDC Report: Life expectancy hits record high

At 65, on average -- men: 18 more years; Women: 21 more years.

10/11/2014

Nonprofits, Companies and City of Apple Valley, Minnsesota To Create Action Plan To Make Aging A Competitive Advantage For Cities

09/26/2014

We’ve all heard the phrase: “Age Friendly Community.”  But what is it and how does a city actually become “age friendly” to create competitive advantage amidst unprecedented demographic change? >>> Read more . . .

why teaching grandmothers to code isn't a crazy idea

Cultivating older entrepreneurs for tech industry.

08/17/2014
Syndicate content