Boomer-Senior Tech Business

Possible business investment area for boomer and aging technology product and service vendors

New technologies to help seniors age in place

Researchers test ways to prevent elderly people from injuring themselves at home.

06/02/2014

Silicon Valley Boomer Venture Summit Connects Venture Capitalists and Angels with Entrepreneurs and Start-ups

05/20/2014
SANTA CLARA, Calif., May 20, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Mary Furlong and Associates will host the Silicon Valley Boomer Venture Summit, and Business Plan Competition, on June 25th at Santa Clara University. The Summit draws a global influencer base to address the ongoing needs facing the Boomer consumer, and to pair investors with entrepreneurs who can bring innovative products and services for the longevity economy to market.

Simple Gadgets to Make Aging Easier

Seven concepts dreamt up by dozens of designers in cities all over the world.

05/12/2014

Launching your boomer/senior, health tech product in 2014

Don’t quit your day job just yet – do the homework first.  Starting a new company in the boomer/senior, mHealth/Digital Health tech space? I hear fairly regularly from those who have this intent.  Maybe they have a prototype they have created. When I don’t hear first, sometimes I catch who they are through the modern-day miracle of Google Alerts. So maybe we chat, maybe I take a look at a website, learn how they are going about getting their funding, and I ask if they know about products that may be similar to what they are doing.  Or have they browsed online catalogs, or spoken to non-profits (if that is one of the target audiences).  Have they studied market sizings and surveys from Nielsen to Pew to the exuberant Semico Research? And so on.  So here’s an updated set of advice for the pre-early stage: >>> Read more . . .

Is technology a threat to senior housing industry?

The answer, says Joseph Coughlin of MIT AgeLab, is both.

03/19/2014

Aging in Place Technology Watch February 2014 Newsletter

Press releases propagate predictive thought. Most wearables and health-related predictions reflect the universe of themselves, that is, gadget press releases and press hype about the rise in wearables, for example, among consumers. Per IDC, in 2014 “wearables and embedded sensors will become mainstream." What is mainstream, considering that only 32% of consumers are even aware of fitness trackers? >>> Read more . . .

Hype cycles: IDC can predict last week, the world ignores the present

Press releases propagate predictive thought. Most wearables and health-related predictions reflect the universe of themselves, that is, gadget press releases and press hype about the rise in wearables, for example, among consumers. Per IDC, in 2014 "wearables and embedded sensors will become mainstream." What is mainstream, considering that only 32% of consumers are even aware of fitness trackers? Or consider that low-risk prediction: "Certain health care organizations will experiment with Google Glass."  Well, maybe not so much this year -- two months before, a Fast Company article interviewed a surgeon who was experimenting, concluding that the device has a 'long way to go.' >>> Read more . . .

Can lobbying preserve paper documents for the oldest seniors?

From that age-friendly government, so here to help.  Rant on. I thought the last word had been said about the idiocy of cutting off paper documents before the rest of the older population was online. But no, yesterday's Washington Post ran an article describing the lobbying group, Paperoptions.org.  Sneered the Post -- it is funded by envelope manufacturers! -- as being a thorn in the side of the administration’s move to push all remaining documents online, regardless of citizenry ability to access those documents. "The glitzy new thing is to be pro-technology," said John Runyan, Consumers for Paper Options’ executive director. "But a lot of government agencies are saying, 'We’re going electronic and the heck with it.'" >>> Read more . . .

Positive Aging Conference highlights Sarasota area technology innovation

The 2014 Positive Aging Conference shines a light on innovation.  At the just-held Conference on Positive Aging in Sarasota, FL, the seventh in its history, to the four themes Wellness, Creativity, Transitions and Community, the conference added  a new theme, Technology.  The conference’s offerings are designed primarily for the Sarasota County attendees, a population of older adults in the region who are the focus of the work of the Institute of the Ages. This year, the Institute of the Ages, led by CEO Tom Esselman, has partnered with InnovateLTC, CEO John Reinhart, an accelerator for new businesses serving the age-related market segments.  That partnership enables a willing and able test audience from Sarasota to find willing and eager businesses looking for pilots of their products and services. >>> Read more . . .

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