Boomer-Senior Tech Business

Possible business investment area for boomer and aging technology product and service vendors

Six steps before launching a tech product for boomers or seniors

Don’t quit your day job just yet – do the homework first.   Starting a new company? I hear fairly regularly from those who have this intent.  Maybe they have a prototype they have created. When I don’t hear first, sometimes I catch who they are through the modern-day miracle of Google Alerts. So maybe we chat, maybe I take a look at a website, learn how they are going about getting their funding, and I ask if they know about products that may be similar to what they are doing.  Or have they browsed online catalogs, or spoken to non-profits (if that is one of the target audiences).  Have they studied market sizings and surveys from Nielsen to Pew to MetLife? And so on.  So here’s a recap of advice for the pre-early stage – more another day: >>> Read more . . .

Old Age in China is a Fledgling Business Opportunity

The potential market is vast, investors in the sector face cultural, as well as financial and administrative, barriers.

10/02/2012

As baby boomers age, technology keeps them safe behind the wheel

New car technology that will make the most safety difference.

09/27/2012

Aging in Place Technology Watch September 2012 Newsletter

Stick versus carrot: re-admission penalties emerge October 1st.  This may be much ado about nothing – but October is the month that hospitals begin being 'penalized' for readmitting the same patients within 30 days of discharge. What’s that mean in dollars and cents?  Well, by forcing hospitals to focus on what are euphemistically called 'transitions' -- cuts of anywhere from 0.42 percent to 1 percent in revenue loom. Or look at the flip side: CMS gets back $280 million from 2200 hospitals immediately.  And who are those pesky people who have been re-admitted? Surprise, they are disproportionately comprised of seniors, initially with diseases like pneumonia, heart attack and heart filure, with more diagnoses added each year. >>> Read more . . .

An aging population is more an opportunity than a problem

Bill Novelli: If we act now, we can actually create a world where aging is a boon and not a burden.

09/27/2012

Center for Technology and Aging Launches Online “ADOPT Toolkit©” and Advisory Services to Help Health Care Organizations Implement Technologies for Chronic Disease Management

09/25/2012

OAKLAND, Calif. – Sept. 25, 2012 – The Center for Technology and Aging announced today the launch of the online “ADOPT Toolkit©” (toolkit.techandaging.org) and associated technical advisory and consulting services. These new initiatives build on the CTA’s experience of successfully managing technology demonstration programs and assisting health care organizations across the country adopt technologies for improving chronic disease management and reducing hospital re-admissions. >>> Read more . . .

New Study Underscores the Potential of Aging Services Technologies (ASTs) to Improve Care and Quality of Life

09/24/2012

LeadingAge and NORC at the University of Chicago Conduct Congressionally Mandated Analysis of Available Technologies and Their Implications for Older Adults and People with Disabilities >>> Read more . . .

CEA Announces Finalists for Inaugural Innovation Entrepreneur Awards

Charlie Hillman of GrandCare Systems named one of the finalists!

09/23/2012

Six trends that signal change in all things aging and health

Stick versus carrot: re-admission penalties emerge October 1st.  This may be much ado about nothing – but October is the month that hospitals begin being 'penalized' for readmitting the same patients within 30 days of discharge. What’s that mean in dollars and cents?  Well, by forcing hospitals to focus on what are euphemistically called 'transitions' -- cuts of anywhere from 0.42 percent to 1 percent in revenue loom. Or look at the flip side: CMS gets back $280 million from 2200 hospitals immediately.  And who are those pesky people who have been re-admitted? Surprise, they are disproportionately comprised of seniors, initially with diseases like pneumonia, heart attack and heart failure, with more diagnoses added each year. >>> Read more . . .

Aging services needs vendors -- commercialism is just fine

Wow – twice in a week, accusations of ‘commercialism’.  An epiphany – occasionally I have them. The backdrop: In Incident A, a future topic I am discussing at an aging services event was (at least temporarily) classified as ‘commercial’ versus ‘educational’ because vendor executives were to be on the panel, jeopardizing the continuing education credit that attendees might get. Then, the very next day, Incident B: a proposed slide deck was critiqued by (different) organizers with the recommendation to remove slides that had many vendor logos. Why? Because it might be perceived by sponsors as commercials for those vendors – again jeopardizing continuing education credits. >>> Read more . . .

Syndicate content