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Market Research Reports

Published (10-09-2015) Boomer Mobile and Wearable Health Click here


Updated: (01-29-2015) Technology Market Overview Report Click here


Published: (06-20-2014) Challenging Innovators 2014 Report Click here


Published (03-08-2013) Next Generation Response Systems Click here


Updated (8-25-2012) Aging and Health Technology Report Click here


Updated (7-31-2012) The Future of Home Care Technology Click here


Published (2-14-2012) Linkage Technology Survey Age 65-100 Report Click here


Published (4-29-2011) Connected Living for Social Aging Report Click here

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mHealth-Digital Health-Telehealth

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mHealth-Digital Health-Telehealth

Toward an Internet of Caring Things

We have seen the scary future – and it is behind the firewall.  Let’s say it: The Internet of Things almost seemed useful – smart objects connected together was once a great marketing tag line. Now it is becoming an Orwellian nightmare, not just because Google can drive the car while you text. Now we know your car has millions of lines of code in it and is easily hacked by two guys on a couch with a laptop. Volkswagen’s internal hacking, uh, deception to meet emissions standards has given visibility to the Internet of Cheating Things, not to mention the Internet of Hacked Things (from drones!!), and Scammed Things (from the refrigerator!!). And just think how obsolete CES "crap gadgets" will seem after the 2016 CES – the real tech news will be these long-distance and unwelcome invaders from afar, redirecting gadgets on the show floor.

Best cities for technology-assisted living

08/12/2015

Today Redfin (www.redfin.com), the next-generation real estate brokerage, released a list of the

Five technology announcements from the 2015 White House Conference on Aging

WHCoA attracted buzz, hopeful announcements and new offerings.  This event was a follow-on to the previous every-decade White House Conferences on Aging -- the most recent of which was the 3-day 2005 White House Conference on Aging. That conference was developed in a hopeful and financially booming time in the US -- its focus was on the pending retirement of the baby boom generation. Today, the economy is not sizzling and since 60 is now the new 50, many of those boomers have not yet retired. Or they've retired from -- or lost -- one job and are now starting a business. The 2005 conference was the first one that had an exhibit hall devoted to technology. This conference was less about a place and more about regional meetings viewings/discussions of the topics and this single day event.   However there were a number of tech-related announcements released in conjunction, including:

Six recent product announcements in the PERS market

What’s new with PERS?  For several years now pseudo-statistics have been floating about the long-standing PERS market – asking the same question over and over hasn’t changed the paraphrased answer: 'The market is approximately $1.5 billion in the US and changes very slowly. Is it true that only 10% of the purchased devices are mobile – that is usable away from the home? Insiders today say that 20% of the sales are for mobile devices. So what else is apparent and new with the PERS space in the past four months -- from the companies own material:

As boomers age, they should be considering diabetes health management tools

Digital tools for diabetes prevention and management.  Population health statistics about diabetes are alarming health professionals, particularly concerning today with 26% of older adults having diagnosed (16% of baby boomers and 27% of seniors) and even undiagnosed diabetes. So there's no surprise – innovation is wanted and much needed. New technology startups are popping up all around to help prospective patients prevent the onset of diabetes – and/or manage it more effectively. While some research casts doubt on the sustainability of these tech interventions, that doesn’t stop new entrants from jumping into the fray. Here are six of the tools available – with descriptions from news articles, smartphone-ish vendor sites or far more informative press reports. Would seniors use these?

2015 Silicon Valley Boomer Venture Summit Announces Finalists

06/19/2015

SANTA CLARA, CA – The Silicon Valley Boomer Venture Summit announced today the six finalists of the Business Plan Competition, which entices entrepreneurs from around the world to showcase their innovative ideas, products, and services for the Boomer and aging market.  The finalists will present their plans at the 12th annual summit, to be held June 30 at Santa Clara University.

Let's remember ten tips for startups entering the market

So you want to launch a boomer/senior, home health tech product or service.  As your new company get ready to travel into battle later this spring at the Silicon Valley Boomer Venture Summit, the Digital Health Summer Summit, Health 2.0, mHealth Summit, and all remaining 2015 launch events to-be-marketed, it is time to for you to revisit this guidance. Perhaps some time soon, your new or existing company will officially launch a new product or service, or perhaps a long-awaited, over-described and much-anticipated offering will finally ship. First read the AARP-sponsored Challenging Innovators research report. Then look over this mid-year updated checklist that continues to hold true – with a few links that are merely examples:

Can anyone make money with designs that are just for seniors?

The more innovation there is, the more some things don’t change.  Stroll through this Aging 2.0 Summit link – and you will see pages of logos of new, newer, and newest companies trying to make a technology or product that could be used to serve seniors – or perhaps help those who serve them. Or the AARP Health50 Live Pitch, or the Stanford Longevity Design Challenge or the Quintiles competition at Wake Forest in North Carolina. Yet again and again, the question bubbles up – can firms make money creating and selling technology or other innovations specifically designed for seniors?  

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