computers, internet and social networking

Includes PC simplification software, personal computers for seniors, home routers, web conferencing, Skype-related, social networking, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn

Facebook 80% decline by 2017?

Tracked like a disease, compared to MySpace rise and fall.

01/23/2014

Device upgrades -- the invasion of the body snatchers

Unable to leave well enough alone – it’s UPGRADE time! Rant on. Perhaps you were one of those who just encountered Samsung/Verizon's pushed Android 4.3 – charmingly tagged 'Jelly Bean' --last week? You stared at the message 'Accept Upgrade Now' and murmured to yourself, how bad can it be? Ah, stupid. Multiple problems. Should have read the forums – something your average consumer does not do. If you did, it would not be reassuring, believe me. Verizon – the only direct and very well-paid participant in this fiasco -- reacted with their usual aplomb: Maybe the customer will shut up if we just send them another phone.  >>> Read more . . .

Why are seniors the fastest-growing demographic on social media

This is your grandfather's Facebook - seniors are the fastest growing demographic.

12/30/2013

Why are seniors the fastest-growing demographic on social media

Laura Carstensen: A lot of the people who are arriving at old age are now coming to old age with a lot of technological sophistication.

11/25/2013

Seniors Talk Back About Tech in Their lives

How their relationship with technology has changed with age.

12/16/2013

Aging in Place Technology Watch November 2013 Newsletter

How did we get people to quit smoking? Do you remember the early days when 'Smoking is bad for your health' ads (based on published research) emerged? In the 1960s, 44% of adults smoked. I thought of the research-based ads this week when Pew Research released an enormous report (94 pages) called The Diagnosis Difference, funded by the California Healthcare Foundation. In its many pages, the report makes two key points: 1) People with chronic diseases are less likely to have Internet access than those without chronic diseases (72% versus 89%, thus described as the "17-point difference.") 2) Those with chronic diseases who are online use the Internet to find information as well as other people who share their chronic disease(s).  And – one more thing – 43% of the 65+ surveyed had two or more chronic conditions. Now you know, but what should you do? >>> Read more . . .

Online older adults do a better job of managing their health

How did we get people to quit smoking? Do you remember the early days when 'Smoking is bad for your health' ads (based on published research) emerged? In the 1960s, 44% of adults smoked. I thought of the research-based ads this week when Pew Research released an enormous report (94 pages) called The Diagnosis Difference, funded by the California Healthcare Foundation. In its many pages, the report makes two key points: 1) People with chronic diseases are less likely to have Internet access than those without chronic diseases --72% versus 89%, thus described as the "17-point difference." 2) Those with chronic diseases who are online use the Internet to find information as well as other people who share their chronic disease(s).  And – one more thing – 43% of the 65+ surveyed had two or more chronic conditions. Now you know, but what should you do? >>> Read more . . .

Grandparents Gone Wired Encourages Youth to Teach Tech at Grandma’s House this Holiday Season

11/25/2013

BOSTON – November 25, 2013 Young people will carve out some quality time with their older relatives during this year’s family gatherings by using their gaming and interactive skills to help grandparents find a place at the technology table. >>> Read more . . .

Who knows technology adoption of the real seniors -- aged 75+?

Accenture exaggerates wildly -- but what should we think?   Rant on. Accenture, seeing a void of 'information' to use to gain new clients, put out an obfuscating headline in a press release last week that precipitates pause. More than pause -- the need for a willing suspension of disbelief: Tech-Savvy Seniors Seek Digital Tools to Manage their Health.  To generate that headline, they surveyed 9015 adults internationally, including the US -- and, get this, of those, they included 200 aged 65+ Medicare recipients. Of course, 2 percent of the survey responders is what led some PR genius at Accenture to grab attention with that headline. So what's a senior, anyway?  Accenture was pitching global consulting services, naturally, and promoting the report that sat behind the headline -- intended for companies filled with young marketers trying to penetrate the mystique of consumers. But when Accenture foists a fact-like assertion, doesn't this make you want to know -- so what IS the technology adoption rate of the real seniors in the US? In September, Pew's researchers sent this along about those aged 76-80: 8.3% have a smart phone, 60.8 have a regular feature phone and 30.9% have neither type. Odds are that the 30.9% population is not online and thus won't be seeking a digital tool to manage their health. >>> Read more . . .

Bridging the Digital Divide...Offline in America

Washington Post special coverage about Internet non-users.

11/13/2013
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