AARP and those boomers, recareerers and home-related professionals

Thinking about 'recareering?' You and many others.  In April 2009, AARP published a report called 'Older Workers on the Move: Recareering in Later Life', a term the study equates with 'occupational change' and 'career change.' This Urban Institute research noted that 43 percent of Americans working full time at ages 51 to 55 subsequently change employers, and 63% of those job changers move into new occupations, including less demanding, lower paying, and self-employment, and also as part of a gradual transition into retirement, 'placing a high premium on escaping from the 9-to-5 grind'. Okay, hold that thought. >>> Read more . . .

NCOA-ASA Aging in America -- many sessions, little tech information

Event blur -- but non-tech pattern is evident. I spent last week trying to keep up with myself at the ASA/NCOA Aging in America Conference in Chicago and the post-event Boomer What's Next summit. Those who saw me dashing around the exhibit hall and conference locations know that I was well-managed by my trusty BlackBerry, and managed to fully circle the exhibit floor twice. >>> Read more . . .

Philips Lifeline achieves passivity -- plus startups and trade associations emerge

Spring has sprung for new and improved tech. Companies in the tech arena of supporting seniors and their caregivers are sporting fresh features and new companies have decided to shake off winter and launch at the Chicago ASA Conference. Each of these announcements is a significant one -- viewed collectively, 2010, as predicted, is already an interesting year -- and it's only March! >>> Read more . . .

Senior housing trends for the next 10 years -- what's the starting date?

Predicting the senior housing future -- it makes you think.  A blog post originally written by Eric Schubert (of Twin Cities senior housing provider Ecumen) caught my eye today -- talking about the 10 senior housing development trends for the next 10 years. The trend list included: sustainable design, universal design, technology, age of amenities, at-home services, NORCs and virtual villages, empowerment, memory care, and new ways of financing. Can't argue with any of that, especially since aging in place has become a buzzword that underpins many of the above markets. >>> Read more . . .

Does advocacy complexity hide products from beneficiaries?

A trip down advocacy lane. Whew. I just came back from downtown Washington DC, where I was within a short walk of the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB), the organization that sponsors the certification for aging in place -- CAPS. But of course, if I turned in any direction, my head was spinning -- there was the Association of This and the Society of That, the Center for Shared Prioritization of An Agenda For Now, and the Advocates for Advocacy of Something Else. >>> Read more . . .

Technophiles should teach technophobes now

Some seniors are left out of the technology tsunami. According to the Pew Research latest numbers, 38% of those 65+ are using the Internet at home. Although it wasn't provided, let's assume that this percentage shrinks by age decade -- until you get down to the optimistic Evercare 100 at 100, with 21% of healthy centenarians admitting that they go online. But of course, this means that the vast majority are not using the Internet at home, or on their cell phones or at all. My take -- the older and frailer they are, the more they are missing out. >>> Read more . . .

MetLife -- Are boomers in the middle...of self-delusion?

Baby boomers born between 1952 and 1958 -- not getting old any time soon.  I've often thought that one end of the baby boomer age range has nothing in common with the other end.  Okay, that doesn't mean that it should be sub-divided into three groups.  But so it goes -- MetLife released its Boomers in the Middle report about the attitudes of this age range, individuals aged 52 to 58 during 2010.  They view themselves, not surprisingly, as healthy and describe 'old' as w-a-a-a-y-y-y out there in the future, when they turn 75 (oddly, age 77 for women and age 74 for men -- no doubt due to variations in life expectancy after age 50.) >>> Read more . . .

GE, Philips, Intel, Mayo Clinic: Why do this telehealth study again and again?

Everybody's doing it - reproving benefits of telehealth. When you put these together, you have to ask why.  What is the reason that large organizations don't cite previous studies rather than spend money to prove the same point? We're not talking about drug trials here, we are talking about telehealth monitoring, a technology that has been around for a decade at least, that has been studied and deployed, but not uniformly reimbursed (which is the real problem here). >>> Read more . . .

Effort beyond task

The dog days of February -- effort beyond task.  I was in a assisted living/nursing home last week and saw the same golden retriever dog (whose master is the ever-cheerful maintenance guy) and down another hall, a snoozing cat. Here's something I've not seen surveyed -- what percentage of senior housing organizations permit and even encourage pets on the premises and in the presence of seniors?  If you know the answer to this question, please contact me! I view the presence of a house pet (and not just the caged birds) as an indicator of effort beyond task -- making me hope that's true of every aspect. >>> Read more . . .

Our future mobile health opportunity, oversized and underdeployed

Apocalypse and opportunity -- the bet is that we're not going to age well.   Our favorite gloom-and-doom source, CNBC, has offered up today's Doomsday Boomer Prediction. Those boomers are going to be a healthcare nightmare: "They visit the doctor more, they consume more services, and they aren’t afraid to use their $7 trillion in collective wealth to improve their quality of life. From physical therapy, to cosmetic surgery, to the latest in life-saving technology, Boomers just aren’t built to grow old gracefully." So inventions of every type are being crafted to help us in our quest to fight this gracelessness and support us as we get old enough to really take that predicted 8% Medicare spending bite out of the GDP by 2035.  >>> Read more . . .

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