Meet or hear Laurie in one of the following:

InsureTech, Washington, DC, May 30, 2019

Silicon Valley Boomer Venture Summit, June 6, 2019

DC Longevity Summit, December, 2019

 

Related News Articles

02/21/2019

Offers a simple method of interaction and provides a centralized user interface. 

02/20/2019

On design principles that matter for older adults.

02/18/2019

Connected devices that fuse health, technology and information.

02/15/2019

Goal is to provide care, potentially diagnose disease.

02/15/2019

For integrators, the smart home technology opportunity for seniors is B2B.

Market Overview for Technology for Aging in Place

You are here

Microsoft Guide for Aging Computer Users

My arms and hands have been hurting for a while. So I was pretty happy when I stumbled (so-to-speak) on Microsoft's "Guide for Aging Computer Users" aka "10 Tips for the Awkward Age of Computing" -- including tips for those XP users who may never upgrade to Vista. Here's an excerpt:

"...Getting older doesn't have to interfere with your ability to use a computer and remain a top performer at work. If PCs can be easily customized to meet the needs of people with severe disabilities such as blindness, deafness, and quadriplegia, they can certainly handle diminished vision, muffled hearing, and stiff fingers. Accessibility features also make it easier to cope with temporary injuries, such as a broken arm, or to manage routine inconveniences such as blurred vision following an eye exam."

This rather charming sequence of cartoons and links to tutorials includes tips for enlarging the screen and magnification, speech recognition, the one for my sore arms - StickyKeys:

StickyKeys allows you to hit one key at a time to execute commands that usually require simultaneous key combinations, such as using SHIFT to type a capital letter, or CTRL+ALT+DEL to display the task manager.

Check it out.