Market Overview for Technology for Aging in Place

Related News Articles

08/22/2019

Homebound seniors deprived of human contact frequently fall prey to scammers.

08/21/2019

A study of 150 participants -  69 rides per person at $21/ride.

08/16/2019

Lyft and Uber and others are contracting with third parties, bypassing the need for older riders to use apps or to have smartphones at all.

08/14/2019

Inside Senior Planet, the tech-savviest retirement community on earth.

You are here

home health care

Title: 

home health care

Technology and the Logistics of Home Care

The US faces a shortage of professional in-home care workers.  The Bureau of Labor Statistics has projected both the growing availability of home care jobs and the shortage of people to fill them. Some states will confront daunting shortages within the next few years: Minnesota will need to fill almost 60,000 direct-care and support positions by 2020, particularly as the state shifts funding toward care in the community rather than in nursing facilities.  The problem is worse in Alaska – where many care workers are nearing retirement age themselves.  Over time, as AARP has predicted, the care gap will widen as boomer population ages – and their care needs catch up with them.  And finally, in nursing, the future has arrived. “Between 2006 and 2016, the U.S. Department of Labor (2007) projected that registered nurse job growth in the home healthcare sector (39.5%) will be larger than in the hospital sector (21.6%).” 

In 2016, has the Future of Home Care Technology been achieved?

Imagine the coordinated care scenario that includes…home care.  In July of 2012, The Future of Home Care Technology was published, based on interviews with 21 industry executives and a survey of 315 home care managers (including non-medical care, home health care, geriatric care managers, organizations and franchises) who represented 34,509 workers across multiple states. And as market research reports tend to do, this one tries to predict the future use of technology.  It s worth a look back, both to re-read a much-downloaded report and place it in 2016 context of actions, announcements, and industry change.

Five new technology offerings for Aging in Place - March 2016

Staying up-to-date by rounding up recent announcements.  As the recently published 2016 Technology Market Overview noted, most older adults will remain in their own homes, served by home/companion and home healthcare providers and assisted by a variety of tech-enabled products and services. Over the past month, new offering announcements have that can help seniors, care providers (family and professional) meet the objective of remaining at home. Here are five, noting as always, that all material is provided from the websites/announcements from the companies themselves.

Event Showcases Technology’s Power to Transform Home Care

01/11/2016

The Home Health Technology Summit will take place March 13-15 at the Hotel Monteleone in New Orleans, offering tailored education on the technologies that homecare providers can leverage to transform business and care.


From PERS to remote patient monitoring to telehealth, technology has the potential to make homecare providers a differentiator in post-acute care.


Five key trends driving 2016 technology for older adults

A look back to look forward.  Consider the context for 2016 innovation, despite (or as a result of) a still-erratic economy, and smaller-cheaper-better base technologies. At the same time, the assisted living industry watches residential age climbing – over half now are 85+. So the desire (or perhaps the only option) to age at home has further intensified. That has created opportunities like the AARP and Leading Age funds; research initiatives like Baycrest and Philips AgingWell; and startup pitch events like Louisville Innovation Summit, or Aging 2.0. Based on looking back at 2015, here then are five categories of trends for 2016:

So wrong: Japan’s hope for the tech-enabled and robotic aging life

Remember the Cyberdine demo of HAL at ASA some years ago? The Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL) was designed by a venture firm in Japan to help a wheelchair-bound individual stand and move. It was very cool. It was priced at that time (2009) at around $5000. By 2014, the device could be rented for the equivalent of $1400/month. And now it has again been modified. This time, according to the WSJ article about Japanese demographics, the country needs its older laborers to work substantially longer. So a 67-year-old worker in the construction industry can stack wood just like someone half his age. Yay. And then there is the charming Pepper robot, selling for an equivalent of $1600, leading recreational activities in senior housing, charming the residents. In Japan, 13% of the population is 75+, and in another statistic, 15% of the 'elderly' population has dementia.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - home health care