Meet or hear Laurie in one of the following:

Webinar: Tech-Enabled Home Care in 21st Century, Jan 24, 2019

Washington DC, February 7-8, 2019

HIMSS, Orlando, February 11-12, 2019

Washington, DC, May 30, 2019

Silicon Valley Boomer Venture Summit, June 5, 2019

Related News Articles

01/22/2019

Amazement and dismay at the show floor of CES in the context of tech for older adults.

01/19/2019

More CES offerings -- including "automating guilt."

01/17/2019

Tech that will help older adults stay independent.

01/16/2019

 Another possible deal for subsidizing the cost of the watch. 

01/16/2019

At this year’s CES, products to help older people with daily life and health issues.

Market Overview for Technology for Aging in Place

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computers, internet and social networking

VAPORSTREAM SECURES FIVE NEW CUSTOMERS IN LONG TERM & POST-ACUTE CARE MARKET

02/21/2017

 Vaporstream, a leading provider of secure, ephemeral and compliant messaging, today announced five new clients in the long term and post-acute care (LTPAC) industry. The company’s secure messaging platform is becoming a first choice among LTPAC facilities and home healthcare workers who must rapidly collaborate among care team members, and communicate with patients outside the traditional provider setting – all while maintaining HIPAA compliance.


Seven Examples of 'Voice First' Approaches to Benefit Older Adults

Has the 'Voice First' interface trend gone mainstream -- and can it benefit seniors?  Some think so. What has initially been driven by Apple platform Siri and the Amazon Echo – and now with Google Home -- is about to become mainstream (or as it is described, 'Voice First’) as the primary way we interact with technology.  There is even a possibility soon that both the Echo and Google Home devices could be utilized for voice calling.  Here are seven examples of 'Voice First' approaches and experiments for seniors. Soon there will be more that reference Google Home – please comment with your own 'Voice First' example -- these are from the company websites or news stories:

Pew Fact Sheets Shed Light on the Tech Adoption of Older Adults

The upshot: older adults are not buying into the trendiest tech.  Maybe it is because they can’t afford it, aren’t aware of it, or are unconvinced of its value.  Or maybe the unconvinced who could afford to spend the money fear privacy violations or identity theft. Or are burned out at staring at too much information on Facebook or Twitter.  Considering their twenty years of life expectancy at age 65, perhaps overcoming technology adoption resistance and gaps should be a greater priority for those who want to help those in the oldest decades live their best lives. Looking at the update from Pew, observe:

Time to ask what technology should be in the home of older adults?

Tech-enabling home care is one lens on future of care.  Venture capitalists listen carefully for trends fueled by talk in the media.  During the past several years, they heard plenty -- about the longevity economy and an investment-related network, digital health watchers like Rock Health and Startup Health 'moonshots', and all things boomer and their tech interest about the future. So they saw home care as a growth opportunity.  Buried in and mostly around the wave of investment and media interest in boomers (oldest age now is 71), the tech industry also noodled a bit more about the over-hyped Internet of Things, emerging voice recognition technologies, and technology adoption trends (everybody except for those aged 75+).

ViewClix Builds Lively Connections for Seniors and Families

01/25/2017

 ViewClix LLC (www.viewclix.com) today announced availability of the ViewClix Smart Frame, the first video plus picture frame that's designed specifically to help seniors and families stay connected.


AARP charts Tech Adoption among older adults -- what does it mean?

What’s happening with older adults and tech adoption?  Not much. Let’s take a look at the AARP 2016 Technology Trends Among Mid-Life and Older Americans. Hint, the report focused most of its analysis on boomers and below. So that leaves the rest of us to look more closely at what they found about older ages, since it seems that this is the most recent set of material on this topic.  From Page 10: “Adults age 70+ are the least likely to have adopted any device.”  And on Page 12: only 29% of those aged 70+ own a smartphone – and of non-owners in that age group, only 4% plan to buy one in the coming (2017) year.

Four slightly cynical wishes for 2017 and beyond

Consider the following possible though unlikely 2017 tech advances.  On the cusp of the new year and the 2017 CES announcement extravaganza, let’s hope. And beyond CES, here are a few semi-optimistic (or glass half-full) wishes for our technology lives – and the corollary of technology media coverage. Let's consider dropping the click bait media fawning over ever little twitch of self-driving cars.* Let's ask car manufacturers to consider simpler user interfaces (like this reviewed VW) for easier-to-manipulate temperature, audio and driving controls.  And what else should we hope for?

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