Market Overview for Technology for Aging in Place

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Cameras -- not necessarily a privacy invasion for dementia

For those who provide care for those with dementia or other limitations -- AARP's Healthy@Home notes that seniors may not object as much as thought to an obvious barrier -- fear of privacy invasion if it can a) make them feel safer, or b) give them more personal peace of mind as well as that of their family and friends.. When aging in place crosses the boundary with aging in trouble (whether in an independent living apartment, assisted living, or nursing home) restricted access video cameras like those from Axis, at around $200, or bundled with a service, like Alarm.com Video that links to a call center, can help dispel confusion about the status of an individual. Are the allegations made about them or by them accurate -- are people really coming into their apartment or room and harassing them? How would you know? How would management know?

In a situation very close to me, an 85-year-old woman with dementia is an apparent victim of sexual harassment by another resident. The facility administrator talks a good game about regularly checking to make sure the male resident -- who is apparently still aware of his behavior and motives -- doesn't enter the room.

How does management know?

They don't of course. And anything they say to the contrary is simply a best effort attempt at knowing.

Your thoughts to the contrary are welcome.