Subscribe by email

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Syndicate content Subscribe via RSS

Related News Articles


Including use of technology.


'They don’t have time to try some new technology.'


Health IT is being embraced by providers, caregivers and elders themselves.


The foundry is cultivating innovations that help older adults age at home.


At the Louisville Innovation Summit, experts discussed role of tech in staying independent.

Market Overview for Technology for Aging in Place

Monthly blog archive

Five New Technology Offerings for Aging in Place – April, 2016

Home is where seniors are, and for the most part, will stay.  But that doesn’t mean they will be shut out from technology innovations – increasingly those innovations are designed to benefit those at home. Increasingly, those organizations that serve older adults must also stay current on new technology developments and assess their fit for the care recipients they serve.  Categories of these April offerings include transportation, medication, housing, robotics, and tracking -- information is derived from the companies.

Real seniors are rightfully skeptical about technology like smartphones

Surveys are foundational for design/marketing – but they don’t include real seniors.  You need to make the set of slides to launch the product, service, or new website. Time to pitch the investment group, the board of directors, the distribution partners, the audience. Yet for the oldest adult markets and product segments that need seniors, the real seniors, individuals (aged 75+) are rarely surveyed – at least that we can tell, because their responses are dumped, clumped and lumped into the 65+ group.

category tags: 

Sensor-tech university research, beloved by media, not by markets

Americans are worried about the risk of seniors falling.  It’s a YARP ("Yet Another Research Project"). Yay.  Carnegie Mellon researchers have provided this 2016 insight based on a survey -- accompanying their engineering project to 'solve' the problem. Coined to describe those special projects run by professors and grad students who appeared to have no access to the Internet to see what others have already developed and commercialized. But they have significant grant money that has yet to run out.

In 2016, has the Future of Home Care Technology been achieved?

Imagine the coordinated care scenario that includes…home care.  In July of 2012, The Future of Home Care Technology was published, based on interviews with 21 industry executives and a survey of 315 home care managers (including non-medical care, home health care, geriatric care managers, organizations and franchises) who represented 34,509 workers across multiple states. And as market research reports tend to do, this one tries to predict the future use of technology.  It s worth a look back, both to re-read a much-downloaded report and place it in 2016 context of actions, announcements, and industry change.

Add more technology breadth to Aging in America

You walked the Exhibit Hall at ASA. You've been there, done that -- the American Society on Aging conferences and always the Exhibit Hall – so that you could note what the organization prioritizes for its many social services attendees to hear about or visit. A few years ago, you were observing that there were many companies, so little tech. This time it seemed that the exhibit hall had even fewer tech offerings than previous, and very few brand-new companies. Big firm entrants were there -- like Tunstall (Exhibit Hall) and GreatCall (Sponsor), along with divisions of larger firms, like Plantronics/Clarity.  You might have thought it was surprising to see a new senior-focused business unit from Hasbro -- with a Companion Robotic Cat (Exhibit Hall). Maybe you noted that a few smaller firms were there – with tech like MyMar (medication reminders for assisted living staff), MyMemory Carebook (life legacy), SwiftAlarm (PERS) and SingFit (dementia care music technology).

Towards five characteristics of health tech market maturity

Five characteristics of health tech market maturity...for a mature market. What would boomers most want to have as key characteristics in the tech world of boomers/seniors? Here’s a starting list – comments welcome. 1) Their privacy is well protected by their insurers, doctors, software, social network and device makers; 2) Their health information is well-integrated into the multi-company health provider world – no need to carry around those CDs of EHRs); 3) Trends in their health patterns are noticed by care providers who use predictive analytics to note possible problems); 4) Boomers do less driving to specialists, more remote consultations, which are appropriately reimbursed through Medicare; 5) Fitness gadgets are replaced by well-being devices and systems.

Five new technology offerings for Aging in Place - March 2016

Staying up-to-date by rounding up recent announcements.  As the recently published 2016 Technology Market Overview noted, most older adults will remain in their own homes, served by home/companion and home healthcare providers and assisted by a variety of tech-enabled products and services. Over the past month, new offering announcements have that can help seniors, care providers (family and professional) meet the objective of remaining at home. Here are five, noting as always, that all material is provided from the websites/announcements from the companies themselves.

MyFitnessDog -- the future of boomers, pets, and technology

New York State catches up to the dining habits of boomers and their pets.  In June this past year, the state legislature in New York passed a bill to will let diners bring their dogs into the restaurant, imitating practices in California, Europe and elsewhere and overturning prior rules, if not actual practice. Thirty-seven percent of baby boomers own a pet, dare we say that might be a dog? Or two to three dogs?  It seems pretty simple now to acquire an emotional support letter that bypasses the rules prohibiting pets on planes that are not trained service dogs. And a number of major retailers (store manager willing) now permit dogs inside the store.  Apartment buildings and hotels now have dog-friendly specials (the Westin Heavenly Dog Bed) and even dog-friendly cocktail hours.

category tags: 

Time for a refresher: ten tips for startups entering the market

So you want to launch a boomer/senior, home health tech product or caregiving marketplace, or caregiver advisory service.  As your new company get ready to travel into battle later this spring to a plethora of lively pitches, it is time to for you to revisit this guidance. Perhaps some time soon, your new or existing company will officially launch a new product or service, or perhaps a long-awaited, over-described and much-anticipated offering will finally ship. First read the AARP-sponsored Challenging Innovators research report. Then look over this updated checklist that continues to hold true – with a few links that are merely examples:

Finding training for seniors with new smartphones, tablets and more

Technology changes faster than older people can keep up.  The latest Android or iPhone is entering the market shortly. Those who may have thought they just HAD the latest, are presented again with modest technological change and plenty of hype. Those that still hang on to much older cell phones will again consider a change -- and surely sales reps want to move the current models before the newest ones crowd the shelves.  But boomers, for example, don’t use their phones in the same way younger people do. And only 50% of seniors age 75+ even have Internet access. So first there is a technology ownership gap, then an access gap, then finally a training gap that must be closed. Here are 6 methods for gaining training in devices and software, with descriptive text drawn from their various websites.


Subscribe to Aging In Place Technology Watch RSS

User login

login account