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11/18/2018

Japan already abounds with high-tech solutions for its aging populace.

11/17/2018

Useful graphic summarizing elderly, adults living at home.

11/15/2018

Music was projected directly through Eversound headphones.

11/13/2018

Transportation has become one of the go-to offerings for several home care agencies.

11/12/2018

A comparison of the medical alerting features of smart watches.

Market Overview for Technology for Aging in Place

Monthly blog archive

2018 Market Overview of Technology for Aging in Place published

Technology and tech-enabled services matter for older adults. The marketplace for technology to assist aging adults in the Longevity Economy is expected to grow to more than $30 billion in the next few years, according to the updated report by Aging in Place Technology Watch, more likely to be based on customization of standard software, using existing platforms than creation of senior-specific products. The report provides predictions about key technology trends for 2018 and beyond. Families, caregivers, and seniors will acquire new tech-enabled services that improve the quality of their lives. The 100-million-strong 50+ market is increasingly aware of technology alternatives -- and providers know it:

Seniors do not benefit from one-off gadget or service inventions

What percent of exhibitors at trade shows survive?  Rant on. It’s not possible to speculate because it is not tracked.  That probably is fine for that gaggle of gadgetry at CES – most acting as trial balloons to test PR-worthiness and buzz.  But what about events whose trade shows are of one-off products or services intended to help older adults? Some events will not allow a small-sponsorship company to be on the show floor, literally placing them in a corner. Consider:  Company B is a startup, not yet a member of a national association. The founder of Company B, CEO B has been too busy inventing a product to line up complementary offerings that could be sold as a solution to a problem. None of the bigger resellers know anything about Company B yet, so the tiny firm takes the corner booth and hopes that on breaks, walking around the floor will generate a business partner or two -- and with serendipity, enable Company B to be part of the solution ABC.

2018: What technology matters for older adults?

Technology utilization among older adults grew.  According to Pew Research, smartphone adoption in particular grew among older adults.  Interestingly in a later survey, those with Amazon Echo or Google Home devices and apps used their smartphones less.  Self-driving technology was a big topic in 2017, much of the hype including mention of benefits for older adults.  Still not clear why an Uber driving itself is better than a Lyft or Uber with a driver – unless it is the well-publicized incidents about Uber drivers.

Voice First: What you say should help get what you need

What makes Voice First special for older adults?  This blog has discussed the emergence of Voice First technology -- speech-enabled interactions with technology -- on multiple occasions. But this occasion is different -- it marks the publication of a research effort and resulting report linked here called The Future of Voice First Technology and Older Adults 2018.  Today's blog post offers a short excerpt of key differences between Voice First technology and prior tech generations that apply to all users – but are unique for seniors -- future research will continue to explore that uniqueness. So what has inspired multiple organizations, including Benchmark Senior Living and Carlsbad by the Sea, to begin their programs? They see that while Voice First technology is an early market with some (noted) limitations, it also represents, unlike prior technology generations, benefits for users.  For users and tech managers, Voice First is:

For seniors, what are the negative impacts from rapid technology change?

Social isolation has grown for the older and/or less tech-savvy segments.  This has been a result of tech replacements that are more difficult to use, whether it is the cost of Wi-Fi connection, excessive device screen sensitivity, screen size, the continuous need for OS upgrades or software updates, many of them security-related as hacker threats grow.  Older adults and those who care about them examine this landscape and wonder what can be done because:

CES 2018: Five More New Technologies For Older Adults

Tech with applicability in the older adult market.   The Digital Health event is also covered in detail through MobiliHealth news and more than a few of those announcements, not even counting the plethora of tech that addresses diabetes and brain health, could benefit older adults.  And more expert and more detailed (and analytical writing) about new tech at CES reveals a few more offerings that could be useful for older adults if applied to that market.  Here are five – more when there’s more:

CES 2018: Five Technologies Useful for Older Adults

CES 2018 is off to a noisy, rainy and motion-filled start.  The Intel dancing drones, the Aptiv Self-Driving rides, Google’s soaked outdoor booth ("Alexa, make it rain"?) and Amazon somewhat smaller-scale "magical experiences." It virtually never rains in Las Vegas – and hasn’t for 121 days – but there’s the video of the downpour -- and Google employees bailing out the booth. The big headline for CES is the battle of the voice assistants for the smart home – which includes Samsung’s Bixby – go ahead, talk to your TV and refrigerator -- as well as Alexa, Google, and Microsoft's Cortana.  

Five 2018 technology opportunities in tech for older adults

2017 was an interesting year -- 2018 should overcome a few obstacles.  Probably the most significant innovation during 2017 was the growth of the Voice First technology market -- but judging by the aisles of gadgets in places like Best Buy, everything else is changing as well. CES is next week, and with it more speakers, TVs, and gadgetry than is seen in Best Buy or anywhere else during the year.  But even as technology leapfrogs and crawls forward, obstacles to broad adoption for older adults remain. Hopefully interest in mitigating social isolation among older adults will lead to the role technology could play. But to make a real difference, here's a look at five areas for improvement in 2018:

Eight Top Aging and Technology Posts from 2017

It was one of the worst and the best of times for innovation and older adults.  It was a year, early on, in which tech-enabled home care appeared to resonate with investors. But traditional home care companies stuck to their knitting, watching the Home Hero shutdown in the midst of an ever-more-startling shortage of prospective workers.  It was the oddest of times, with the $80 billion hype of self-driving cars partly focused on the transit needs of older adults. And it was the best of times – as 2017 was the year of Voice First technology lift-off – as Amazon’s Echo forced the hand of Google’s Home. Ultimately seniors will benefit from technology that fits both their interest and needs -- see the Market Overview update from early in the year. Here are the top blog posts from 2017:

The Unstoppable Momentum of Self-Driving Cars

Everybody’s doing it – talking, investing, launching an initiative for self-driving cars.  Imagine 300,000 lives saved per decade, preventing the 37,500 deaths just last year.  In fact, the development of self-driving cars and other Autonomous Vehicles (AV), have received a whopping $80 billion in investment to date.  Amid the hype, obstacles are occasionally noted (like roads) and surveyed consumer disinterest, including AAA, JD Power, Gartner. In particular, older people might not be interested, even though enabling older adults to keep driving is one of the oft-repeated rationales by self-driving car evangelists. And of course, older adults want to age in place.  So self-driving cars are often described as enablers.

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Latest Trends

Harvard, Senior housing: Older Americans face challenges, Nov, 2018

AARP: Job opportunities for older workers, October, 2018

AARP: 2018 Loneliness and Social Connections, September, 2018

2018 Home and Community Preferences of Adults, August, 2018

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Market Overview, Technology for Aging in Place, 2018

The Future of Voice First Technology and Older Adults, 2018 

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MedCity News: Voice Tech is Coming to Healthcare, October, 2018

Next Avenue: How Technology Can Help Us Age in Place If We Let it, Sept, 2018

Hartford Funds: How Talking to Devices Will Transform Life After 65, July, 2018

Voice, independence-focused technologies drive aging in place forward, June, 2018

The Thrive Center Unlocks an Innovation Hub for Senior Living, February, 2018

Net Neutrality Rollback Raises Concerns for Senior Living, December, 2017

US News & World Report: Tech to Help Americans Age Better, Oct, 2017

MoneyWatch: 10 smart home features to help you age in place, Oct, 2017

Best Buy Bets on Adults Remotely Monitoring Their Aging Parents, Oct, 2017

Next Avenue Names its Top 50 Influencers in Aging, September, 2017

Health Tech's 2017 Must-Read IT Blogger List, July, 2017

Pew: Older Generations Embrace Digital Life, May, 2018

Pew: Social Media Use in 2018

Pew: Who uses the Internet, Broadband, March 2018

View All Trend Studies/Reports

View Our Research Reports 

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IG Living: The Silver Tsunami and Aging in Place, February, 2018

AARP Explores Tech Platforms Designed for Family Caregivers, January, 2018

Front Porch: Amazon Alexa Pilot, December, 2017

Pew: Nearly half of Americans use digital voice assistants, December, 2017

Medicare Spends More on Socially Isolated Older Adults, November, 2017

 

 

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